Army Expanding Mental Health Program Despite Research

Mental Health Solutions Need Coverage, Too

The Army study shows no direct link between the CSF training and reducing rates of diagnosis for depression, anxiety and PTSD. It did show a small, indirect benefit. Soldiers who trained in areas of optimism and adaptability and who scored well in those traits showed a 13% reduction in all three illnesses when they were grouped together into a single statistical category. But there was no direct or indirect impact on PTSD, co-author Paul Lester said Monday. An Army slide program used to promote CSF for commanders did not make that distinction, saying only that resiliency program produced “13% fewer diagnoses of anxiety, depression and PTSD.” Soldiers who took the training had significant fewer diagnoses for drug and alcohol abuse, the study said. However, critics of the training say using the number of diagnoses to determine training’s benefit misses large numbers of soldiers who may or may not have developed substance abuse problems.
To read the original version including any supplementary images or video, see Army expanding mental health program despite research

Any number of things may deter people from seeking or connecting with available help — anxiety, medication changes, and lethargy, to name a few. A persistent outreach effort by a person or team aimed at building a genuine relationship with the recovering person is crucial. Since 1948, Fountain House has been confronting the social challenges of mental illness and developing a response that includes these vital features. Fountain House serves New York City from its Hell’s Kitchen location, but the inherent humanity, social inclusivity, personal empowerment, and innovation of this approach has inspired its replication around the world and has earned federal recognition in the U.S. as an evidence-based practice . It is the gold standard for community mental health programs, and it is the model for more than 200 programs in 38 states and another 100 programs internationally that successfully address the social impact of mental illness and support people to build meaningful lives in their communities.
For the source version including any supplementary images or video, visit Mental Health Solutions Need Coverage, Too

AJ French: For Mental Health Awareness Week, change your language and your outlook

But what about the victims, their families, the campus, and the workplace? Those voices don’t stop — they cannot stop — they are left with the fallout and they are left to face the system failures that likely caused the forever changes in their lives and communities. So what about the question, was the shooter mentally ill? We must end the stigma and blame associated with the term “mentally ill.” Of course the individual who walks onto a campus or into a school, movie theatre, shopping center parking lot or workplace and shoot innocent people is not thinking or behaving in the realm of stable mental health. However, we need to change the conversation and the verbiage.
To read the source version including any supplementary images or video, see Break the Silence: A Discussion on Mental Health in America

Break the Silence: A Discussion on Mental Health in America

However, many such problems worsen over time and can significantly decrease the odds of children successfully negotiating the many developmental tasks facing them on their path to healthy adulthood. Research on early child development has shown that children of affluent parents typically get on a positive trajectory in which educational and social success leads to further success, whereas children of poor parents are far more likely to get on a negative trajectory in which failure leads to further failure. Moreover, the longer children are on a negative trajectory, the more severe and intractable will be its effects on their mental and physical health. For nearly three decades, middle class incomes in both the United States and Canada have stagnated in real dollar terms and lower class incomes have actually decreased. In contrast, the incomes of the top 10 per cent have increased enormously. Essentially, the middle class is being hollowed out and more families are descending into poverty.
To read the original version including any supplementary images or video, see Mental health and poverty

Source: Mental health paperwork found at home of Miriam Carey after Capitol chase

People run for cover as police converge to the site of a shooting.

These are very real fears, not without merit, experienced by individuals with mental health conditions. Solidifying this fear is the exploitation of people dependent upon mental health and other human services who often are not positioned to advocate on their own behalf. When institutions are funded at four times the cost of community housing with supportive services, we are paying more to care less. When individuals are denied needed medication, and subsequently their mental health declines, Illinois SMART Act becomes a dumb decision that can lead to death. We must begin to think about what is within our power to change.
For the source version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.sj-r.com/opinions/x1868848349/AJ-French-For-Mental-Health-Awareness-Week-change-your-language-and-your-outlook

Mental health and poverty

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Police say Carey rammed barricades and police cruisers — actions Washington police Chief Cathy Lanier said appeared deliberate — and sped down Pennsylvania Avenue before crashing. Two law enforcement officers were injured, and officers shot her to end the incident. The Carey family is questioning whether shooting her was the only way to end the chase. “We want to know if protocols were followed,” family attorney Eric Sanders said on CNN’s AC360. Carey apparently did not have a weapon, but did have a 1-year-old girl in the car with her.
To read the source version including any supplementary images or video, visit Source: Mental health paperwork found at home of Miriam Carey after Capitol chase

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