Women May Get Unneeded Osteoporosis Screening

Routine osteoporosis and bone density exams may not be the best predictor of broken bones in the future

Peter F. Schnatz, of the Reading Hospital and Medical Center in Pennsylvania. In some cases, women might ask for screening, he told Reuters Health. Or some doctors may not be aware of the guidelines and believe, for example, that it’s best to screen all postmenopausal women. Whatever the reasons, “the findings are certainly not encouraging,” Schnatz said.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, see http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/29/us-women-osteoporosis-idUSTRE77S46M20110829

Study suggests testing bone health in older people less often may be safe

27., at The Woodland Assembly of God, located at 360 Gun Club Road. Nancy Smith of Clarkston, WA attended a Life Line Screening and said, I cannot tell you what peace of mind these test results have brought to me. Life Line is hoping local residents will take advantage of the opportunity as they try to educate people about four key points regarding strokes and bone issues: Stroke is the third leading cause of death and a leading cause of permanent disability. 80 percent of stroke victims had no apparent warning signs prior to their stroke. Preventive ultrasound screenings can help avoid a stroke. Screenings are fast, noninvasive, painless, affordable and convenient. Screenings identify potential cardiovascular conditions such as blocked arteries and irregular heart rhythm, abdominal aortic aneurysms, and hardening of the arteries in the legs, which is a strong predictor of heart disease. A bone density screening to assess osteoporosis risk is also offered and is appropriate for both men and women.
For the source version including any supplementary images or video, see http://www.thereflector.com/news/article_6c6a742e-256d-11e3-94e2-0019bb2963f4.html

Among the 113, there were 88 broken hip bones, 33 forearm fractures, 24 spinal fractures and five shoulder fractures, the researchers wrote. Based on the second bone density tests that reclassified risk of fracture, only 3.9 percent of study participants who were reclassified actually broke a hip. Of those reclassified as at risk for breaking their forearm, spine or shoulder, 9.7 percent experienced such a fracture. Also, ongoing follow-up tests showed that bone density decreased an average of 0.6 percent per year for the entire group of 802 patients. Overall, study participants ranged from those who gained as much as 5.6 percent in bone density during the study period to those who lost as much as 9 percent of bone density. These findings led these researchers to conclude that density tests repeated “after four years did not meaningfully improve the prediction of hip or major osteoporotic fracture.
To read the source version including any supplementary images or video, visit Routine osteoporosis and bone density exams may not be the best predictor of broken bones in the future

Stroke and Osteoporosis screenings are available

Sarah D. Berry of the Harvard-affiliated Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife in Boston. The researchers tracked 310 men and 492 women with an average age of 75 years for up to 10 years after they had an initial bone-density measurement. Repeat testing four years after the first test found relatively few instances where someone lost enough bone mass to put them at heightened risk for hip fractures. Overall, repeat bone-density testing after four years improved the ability to identify those at higher risk by only 4%. Time to slow down testing?
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit Study suggests testing bone health in older people less often may be safe

Calcium, vitamin D opportunity grows as osteoporosis prevalence rises

And because it is not being addressed as well as it should be it is going to get worse before gets better, said David B. Lee, executive director of the NBHA. 48 million with low bone mass NOF recently released new data on the prevalence of osteoporosis showing that approximately 9 million adults currently have osteoporosis and another 48 million have low bone mass, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis. With the number of those at-risk of developing osteoporosis at an all time high, making the connection between broken bones and osteoporosis has never been more important. The organization now recommends that the treatment of any fracture after age 50 should include a bone density test. This is still something of a rarity, even for patients in the highest risk group, Wallace said. It still goes unnoticed a lot of times. Even with postmenopausal women that fracture only about 20% to 25% of them get a bone mineral density test after they fracture, he said.
To read the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit Calcium, vitamin D opportunity grows as osteoporosis prevalence rises

New insights into osteoporosis

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Genetics plays a role in certain families. So does being thin, small-boned and of white or Asian ancestry. Smokers, those who take three or more alcoholic drinks a day and patients who require corticosteroids to treat asthma or arthritis are at increased risk. Osteoporosis, a silent killer, results in fractures of the spine, hip and wrist. A fracture can also occur with the speed of lightning from a forceful hug, or a sneeze can suddenly break a rib.
For the source version including any supplementary images or video, visit New insights into osteoporosis

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